Isotropic Field

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he isotropic field is the frame of reference for the entirety of existence. It is an infinite Euclidean manifold embodying the concept of unit (absolute) length [a simple gridwork into which the positional fields (countable units) are embedded with an expectation of one per unit cube of the "I-field"]. This field is isotropic in that it is the same everywhere whereas the P-field has a center.

The isotropic grid can be deformed by compression/expansion or twists but may not rotate as a whole as is the case with the positional field. The field cannot be compressed without a corresponding expansion which preserves its defined uniformity, vis. if a compression miraculously appeared, then, the unit density character of the field would be altered to 1+ something. And since a compression or expansion cannot appear without its mate it follows that a single compression cannot disperse without the corresponding dispersal of its mate.

Thus, an electric charge (which is a compression/expansion of the I-field) cannot disappear without taking the opposite charge with it. This is the ultimate logical reason for charge conservation. It does not require an infinite amount of energy to hold a charge together against self-repulsion. The logic of symmetry is what keeps it together. Logic preempts energy.

Observe what happens when we attempt to expand the isotropic field at some point in space. We must contract the perimeter of the expansion as its concomittent. The only way to produce expansion with contraction is by accelerating the positional field and having the isotropic field act in correspondence with it. Then we get the expansion at the front end of the acceleration and the contraction at the rear exactly opposite to the positional field's state.

The same reasoning applies to shearing effects (twists, i.e. magnetic fields).


An area of compression has an identity analogous to that of a positional field and has a behavior characteristic of its type.

It sends a transverse wave out radially with amplitude diminishing as 1/r and frequency remaining constant..




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